Medical History Research Seminar 1:

Doing Research

 

Training in methodological aspects and research techniques of the history of medicine, with particular attention to strategies for locating and interpreting primary sources, in libraries, archives, and museums. Develops students’ ability to design and conduct interdisciplinary research in an independent research project of their own choosing.

 

 

Content

Seminar sessions address key strategies for defining a research focus, locating relevant primary source materials, and methods of source analysis. Professors and scholars from various universities and institutions address common characteristics of archives and museum collections, such as the “medical gaze” and the absence of patient perspectives. They then explain techniques for enriching the analysis of traditional sources as well as ways to bring in new perspectives by focusing, for example, on oral histories, museum objects, or emotions and senses.

 

Attendance at all sessions is mandatory. More information on https://masters.vu.nl/en/programmes/history/index.aspx

 

 

 

 

Medical History Research Seminar 2:

Medicine in Society

 

Engagement with new approaches to the history of medicine. Develops students’ ability to design and conduct interdisciplinary research in an independent research project of their own choosing, to critically evaluate existing historical scholarship in the field, and to consider the impact of emerging trends on our interpretation of the past.

 

Content

Medical theories and practices reflect the society in which they were formed as well as reshaping the world around them. In this seminar, this dynamic relationship between medicine and society is examined through a focus on the most innovative and exciting new approaches emerging in the field of medical history. An international group of professors and scholars from universities and institutions around the country will discuss their own work and the implications of their projects for the interpreting the past. How does our understanding of the history of medicine shift when we combine the different perspectives of healthcare practitioners and patients, for example? What can we learn when we examine local public health issues in broader global contexts, from international drug trades and the treatment of addiction to emerging infectious diseases and public health surveillance and quarantine?

 

More information on https://masters.vu.nl/en/programmes/history/index.aspx